5 Tips on Sleeping Well

Do you have trouble falling asleep?  Does your mind seem to race even after you climb into bed?  Do you have worries on your mind that prevent you from easily falling asleep?  Do you toss and turn, finding you can't shut your mind off?  Or, do you sleep ok, but wake up and find you are still tired?

You are not alone!  Trouble sleeping (difficulty falling asleep and/or sustaining sleep) is something that I've noticed many people struggle with.  Or, maybe you are able to fall asleep easily now, but you've had times in the recent past when you couldn't fall asleep no matter how tired you were.  The Sleep Foundation (https://sleepfoundation.org/media-center/press-release/lack-sleep-affecting-americans-finds-the-national-sleep-foundation) reports that 45% of Americans said they had difficulty sleeping in the past week, with women struggling with insomnia more than men.  Good quality restorative sleep is so important for us to function at our best!  It is necessary for memory consolidation, helps reduce our risk of certain diseases like heart attacks and diabetes, and improves our decision making.

'Sleep hygiene' is the fancy term for any practice that helps you to sleep well consistently.  I suggest the following tips, which can be especially helpful for the ones who suffer with anxiety and racing thoughts at bedtime:

1-Use a sound machine.  Any sound, whether it’s white noise or rain softly falling, can help block out other extraneous sounds.  The soothing, repetitive nature of any sound machine track can help you relax.  There are even apps (Relax Melodies, or Sound Machine) available that have tracks of the rain forest, a babbling brook, or birds chirping that you can use for free.

2-Keep your bedroom cool and dark.  Use blackout curtains if you need it.  Conversely, when it is morning time, open up the curtains immediately, as the sunlight can help jumpstart your day and give you energy.

3-Limit naps to 15-30 minutes at most.  Skip naps if at all possible, because you most likely won't be ready for bed at your typical bed time. 

4-Have a consistent sleep/wake time.  Even if it’s the weekend, or your day off, it’s best to wake up within 1 hour of your normal wake time to not throw off your bed time that night.  And, go to bed at approximately the same time every night.

5-(THIS ONE IS THE MOST IMPORTANT!) Create a relaxing bedtime routine that includes no electronics.  Just as children crave routine, especially at bedtime, we do too!  A routine (like bath, pjs, read a book, and bedtime for kids) helps our brains to understand what is coming next.  Your brain will learn to expect that soon you'll want to fall asleep.  So, starting at least one hour prior to bedtime, turn off all electronics (yes, this includes your iPad, computer, tv and cell phone).  Some of these electronics have a “nighttime” lighting setting, but any light that they emit can prohibit your brain from naturally producing the melatonin that signals your body that you are tired.  Take a warm bath or shower.  As your body temperate decreases from the bath or shower, you will naturally become drowsy.  Take some time to journal your thoughts, or work on a crossword puzzle.  Read.  Crochet.  Do Sudoku.  If you turn off your phone, you’ll find you have time to do some of the things you previously did in the non-digital age, while promoting good sleep habits.

Give some of these a try and let me know what works for you!

Let's Start This Journey Together!

I decided I wanted to start to blog, as a way to offer some insights, thoughts, tips to more than just my clients.  I often see patterns in my sessions, certain topics that come up from multiple clients, and thought it might be helpful to share with you!  I also want to provide information on improving your mental health or maintaining good mental health, addressing topics that maybe are not completely understood or talked about often.  I want to help fight the secrecy and shame that is often portrayed in seeking therapy services.  Unless you have been in therapy, you might not know what really happens behind closed doors.  And, I’ve found, we tend to be scared of what we don’t know!  

Additionally, I challenge my clients to grow and change in areas in which they desire, and writing this blog is my challenge for myself!  I figured it wasn’t fair to talk about growth, and doing things you are afraid of, if I didn’t take my own advice!  My writing style is very formal, due to years of schooling and graduate training.  I was trained to write scientific research papers, and never really developed a conversational style of writing.  My area of growth is to be more relatable (and, less stuffy) with my writing.  I am going to use this blog to grow!  I ask for your grace and understanding as I go along, and as I learn.

I also ask for feedback from you.  What do you want to read or learn about?  In what ways could I make things easier for you to understand?  So, please, make comments, ask questions....I want to help make mental health easier to talk about.

I look forward to learning with you!  Stay tuned....my next few blog posts will be covering good sleep habits, dealing with difficult family members, and anxiety.